Category Archives: Photography

The Green River Through Time-Lapse

Rather than share more of my Green River Canoe expedition with words, here is a selection of trip highlights as seen through time-lapse photography.

 

 

Self-portrait on the Flaming Gorge Reservoir

 

Stars at night in Desolation Canyon

 

Moving shadows in Desolation Canyon

 

Getting camp ready for the night in Desolation Canyon

 

The Roosevelt Fire that rained ash on Jon and mine’s first day, as seen from further down the Green River (near Warren Bridge, Wyoming)

 

Lightning storm reflects on the Green River from a campsite near Naples, Utah

 

How to set up a tent in 24 seconds. Kingfisher Island Boat Camp, Flaming Gorge Reservoir

 

Sunlight breaks into Desolation Canyon above Chandler Falls Rapid

 

A starry evening at camp, Desolation Canyon

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Fun with Time-Lapse #2

Second batch of time-lapse videos. Enjoy!

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Sunrise at Norway House Cabin, Camp Widjiwagan, Ely Minnesota. March 2018.

 

Clouds along the Lake Superior shoreline, Gooseberry Falls State Park, Minnesota. May 2018.

 

Circumpolar star trails with tree in focus in foreground, stars out of focus. Video fades to white as night turns into dawn. Ely, Minnesota. April 2018.

 

Northern Lights dancing near Ely, Minnesota. April 2018.

 

Flowing water in mud puddle from spring meltwater. Ely, Minnesota. March 2018.

 

Calgary, Alberta skyline transitioning from dawn to morning. April 2018.

 

Calgary, Alberta city skyline at night. April 2018.

 

Traffic on Calgary’s Reconciliation Bridge. April 2018.

 

Another angle of the Reconciliation Bridge crossing the Bow River. April 2018.

Barns Across the Continent

On a recent spring break journey, I drove 3,200 miles across the top the US and Canada—and all I did was take pictures of barns! But the rural country landscape does fascinate me, and I find it particularly compelling to photograph. As I drove across the land, the aesthetics of the structures changed with the landscape. Here is a photographic escapade of the rural journey and what I saw: barns, grain elevators, abandoned homesteads, and more.

 

 

And here was the route:

Spring Break Route 2

 

 

 

Fun with Time Lapse

I’ve been playing some tricks with time by capturing scenes with time-lapse photography. Here are some results to share after a few months of trial and error. Most scenes taken near Camp Widjiwagan outside of Ely, Minnesota.

 

My first time-lapse ever. Icebergs floating past Big Red Lighthouse, Holland Harbor, Michigan.

 

Sunrise and moving shadows, Burntside State Forest, Minnesota

 

Sunrise over Burntside Lake, Minnesota

 

Sunset and full moon rising over Burntside Lake, Minnesota

 

Rotating stars with fleeting glimpses of the Northern Lights

 

Starry and Cloudy Sky at Camp Widjiwagan

 

Sigurd Olson Center at Camp Widjiwagan

 

Hanging out around the campfire

Winter on the North Shore

Photographic explorations of Minnesota’s North Shore of Lake Superior and inland to the Iron Range.

 

The Barns of Ottawa County

The rural landscape around where I grew up, in Ottawa County, Michigan, never seemed exceptional or particularly noteworthy. The real sites, for me, always laid at the coast, along the sandy wooded shores of Lake Michigan. Only recently, after spending much time away from my hometown, has the rural heritage of my landscape gripped me in a way it hadn’t before. The agricultural scenes that once seemed commonplace and went blithely unnoticed by me now stood out in a conspicuous fashion. I became captivated by my once overlooked surroundings.

Barns, as a subject matter, have long drawn me to capture their images in photography. Now I have felt compelled to turn the cameras towards the barns that I may have seen regularly since childhood, but now notice again with fresh eyes. Winter adds an extra element of beauty to them, lying dormant, coated in a thick veneer of white. They come in many different styles, sizes, and colors. Gambrel roofs, lean-to’s, reds, whites and weathered wood. Some are still working barns, others long since abandoned to the elements. Though common, their ruggedness and utilitarian aesthetic provide an unnoticed kind of beauty.

 

 

City of Light, City at Night

Turning my local metropolis, Grand Rapids, into an experimental photography studio for nighttime long exposure photography. Photos taken December 2017.

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Grand River Waterfront, with Grand Rapids Public Museum (left) and Bridgewater Place Towers (right)  behind Pearl Street Bridge

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Bridgewater Place overlooking the Grand River and Pearl Street Bridge

 

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Plaza Apartments and the Blue Bridge above the Grand River

 

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Pedestrians on the Blue Bridge

 

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JW Marriot Hotel and Amway Grand Plaza over the Grand River

 

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Blurring the ice skaters in motion with long exposure, at Rosa Parks Circle

 

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Ice Skaters in front of the GRAM, at Rosa Parks Circle

 

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Monroe Center decorated in lights for the holidays. Capturing the red streak of taillights with long exposure.

 

 

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A Quiet Corner in the City: The Tavern on the Square

 

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On the Fringes of Suburbia: Capturing the lights of passing traffic at a country stoplight

 

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Turning Skyward: The brightest stars peak through the clouds while the reflective snow brightens the foreground of this image taken at night

Night Lights

A photograph is a modicum of truth as it captures an instant in time, a scene reflective of precisely how everything appeared the moment the shutter was released. True? Not exactly. The realm of photography is filled with all sorts of trickery and inexactness. In fact, as early as there has been photography, there have been those using the medium to alter the way reality is captured and presented. Images on film do not appear precisely how even our own eyes view them. This is because of the effect of optics—cameras, as well as our own eyes, are merely just optical sensors. Both take in light photons and use them to gather information about the world. For our eyes, photons fall upon our retinas and are manifested by our brains into our vision. For a camera, the photons fall upon the film (or in digital photography are recorded on a computer) and render what we call a photograph. Under most circumstances, the images generated by a camera are similar to what we’d view in real life. But when the level of light gets low, a whole new world of photography opens up, one where the varying levels of light can create interesting scenes through different levels of exposure.

The following photographs I took at night as a few experiments in capturing the scenes of light and darkness around Camp Burgess.

 

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The night sky is full of the light of stars. It’s beauty causes us to gaze heavenwards with wonder. Though our brain can process the combination of light and darkness just fine to render a starry image, a camera cannot simply point and shoot a scene from the night sky. The level of light is just too low to record anything but blackness. In order to photograph the night sky, the shutter of the camera must remain open longer than an instant. For as long as the camera’s shutter remains open, light falls on the sensors and the image being rendered is evolving. For this photo of the Big Dipper through the trees, I left my camera’s shutter open for 30 seconds. In the dimness of night, leaving the shutter open for that long enabled the stars, as well as the trees in the foreground, to appear in the scene. (If you’re having trouble seeing the images, then turn up your computer’s brightness)

The following four photographs all were shot from the same location.

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Here is the night sky again, with the forest in the foreground. The exposure time was set for 30 seconds, which allowed the stars time to emit enough light to be captured in the image. The outline of the Milky Way can be scene across the sky. This is pretty standard night sky photography.

 

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But I decided to use the optical sensing of the camera to my advantage to create some digital trickery. The night sky is great, but I wanted to see how some artificial light would look in the exposure. This is the same image as before, except that I shone my green star laser in front of the camera while it was recording the image. The streaks of green that were only temporary flashes in the sky look as if they were shining beacons from within the cosmos.

 

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Instead of adding artificial light to the sky, for this image, I added extra light to the trees in the foreground. This is a photographic technique known as light painting. The additional light shone on a nearby object is captured during the long camera exposure, causing a highlighting effect on that object. With this, the details of the trees in the foreground can pop out.

 

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For my final photograph of the series, I increased the exposure time from 30 seconds to a few minutes. The increased length that the shutter is open permits an accumulation of light to enter the camera sensor and be recorded in the image. The wonderful thing about exposures at night longer than a few minutes is the ability to capture star trails. Since the Earth is continually rotating, the placement of the stars changes in the course of the night. This change is below our threshold of perception, but not the camera’s. In a star trail photograph, the stars themselves appear to move across the sky, leaving a curved bright streak showcasing where they have been. I absolutely love star trails. Unfortunately, from my location in Sandwich, Massachusetts, the light pollution was too much to capture star trails. After just a few minutes, the light from the nearby city dominated the image. The resulting photograph looks like a foggy forest captured during daytime. But remember—this photograph was taken in the dark!

 

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Some more fun with artificial lights here, and some more light painting. Here, I used my high-powered green star laser to write some words on the trees in the foreground. The light emitted from the laser is strong and concentrated enough to appear like a neon tube-light in the trees. “Base Glamp” is the nickname of where I’m working this summer.

 

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More fun with lights in the dark. Similar to star trails, any moving artificial light that falls upon the camera’s sensor gets recorded as a streak in the image. Here I had a few friends walk through a field in the darkness as they shined a few flashlights and headlamps around while the exposure time was set for 30 seconds. The resulting light streaks and spotlighting effects always cause an unexpected result. Though the scene itself is nothing much, the very process of recording the image provides a good artistic flair.

 

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Low levels of ambient lighting at night provides an opportunity to capture scenes highlighted by a single light source. Here, the scene in the composition is dim and the only light source is from a single headlamp. Hence, the hands are illuminated while everything surrounding them fade into darkness of the nighttime.

 

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Fire can also provide a source of light at night. The beauty of flames and glowing embers is pleasing to look at as well as to photograph. Compared to the stars, the light emitted by a fire is bright. It takes an exposure of only a few seconds to capture an image like this.

 

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Finally, using my zoom lens, I can safely get close to the fire to photograph a macro of the glowing coals. Just a few seconds exposure captures the soft, glowing light of the embers but blurs the flames crawling from under the log on in the middle.